Blog

Blog

Broadening the Subject-Matter Jurisdiction of the International Criminal Court to Better Prosecute Twenty-First Century Harms

Elena Macomber In 2002, the Rome Statute came into force and operations at the International Criminal Court (ICC) commenced.[1] With the twentieth-century backdrop of two world wars and massive ethnic violence, both individuals and states were motivated to create a permanent and universal body to prosecute systemically violent crimes against

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Electric Protectionism: New Clean Vehicle Tax Credit Limitations Make EVs Less Accessible for American Consumers in the Name of “America First” Trade Policy

Dominic Detwiler In August of 2022, President Biden signed the Inflation Reduction Act (IRA) into law, which the administration claims was part of “the most aggressive climate action in U.S. history”[1] and would move the country forward in the President’s “goal that at least 50 percent of all new passenger

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The New International Agreement to Address Biodiversity Loss

Maria Pfister What is the agreement? Last month, over 190 countries signed a new agreement to protect global biodiversity.[1] The agreement, titled the “Kunming Montreal Global Biodiversity Framework,” was the end result of a nearly two-week conference, the 15th United Nations Biodiversity Conference of the Parties (“COP15”), held in Montreal

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A Few More Steps in the Right Direction?: COP15 and the Fight for Biodiversity

Harrison LeFrois After widespread coverage of the 27th United Nations’ (“UN”) Climate Conference of the Parties (“COP27”) held in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt in November, 2022,[1] there is more hopeful environmental news to share. The 15th UN Biodiversity Conference (“COP15”) was held in Montreal, Canada from December 7 through December 19,

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The Consequences and Future of the U.S. Department of Justice’s Failed “China Initiative”

Connor Smith In  February 2022, the Department of Justice (“DOJ”) ended the “China Initiative,”  an effort launched in November 2018 by then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions to identify and prosecute Chinese spies who had purportedly infiltrated American research institutions—both public and private.[1] The China Initiative sought to combat industrial espionage and

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It’s Not as “Vanilla” as You Think: The Child Labor Problem in Madagascar’s Vanilla Industry

Ali Casey Vanilla is a spice that is enjoyed across the globe. Madagascar, an island country located off the southeastern coast of Africa, produces around 75 to 80 percent of the world’s natural vanilla.[1] Moreover, vanilla is Madagascar’s leading agricultural export.[2] Madagascar vanilla beans are considered the “gold standard” of

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