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It’s Not as “Vanilla” as You Think: The Child Labor Problem in Madagascar’s Vanilla Industry

Ali Casey Vanilla is a spice that is enjoyed across the globe. Madagascar, an island country located off the southeastern coast of Africa, produces around 75 to 80 percent of the world’s natural vanilla.[1] Moreover, vanilla is Madagascar’s leading agricultural export.[2] Madagascar vanilla beans are considered the “gold standard” of

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Prison Law Libraries, or Paralegal Prison Officers? Why Not Both: Using Ghana as a Model for U.S. Correctional Officer Education Reform

Jasmin Hernandez Du Bois Despite holding less than five percent of the world’s population, the United States has nearly twenty-five percent of the world’s total prison population.[1] Using Ghana’s paralegal training program as a guidepost, this article seeks to encourage the United States to take a progressive approach to prison

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No Way Out: How COVID-19 Restrictions Force Extra Burdens on North Koreans

Jay Kim Soon after the COVID-19 outbreak, the world was under lockdown, but in 2022, the frontline and borderline areas of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (“North Korea”) remain closed.[1] Moreover, the North Korean government continues to enforce the “shoot to kill” order.[2] Under this order, people are shot

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The CHIPS and Science Act is Unlikely to “Chip Away” at Taiwan’s Position in the Semiconductor Industry Any Time Soon.

By Grant Newman In September, President Biden reiterated he would send U.S. forces to Taiwan if there was an unprecedented attack, calling into question the United States’ “strategic ambiguity” policy after Nancy Pelosi’s visit to Taiwan was met with a display of Chinese military exercises. [1] Fear of a potential

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The Presumption Against Extraterritoriality: United States v. Bowman and the Importance of Nationality

By Matti Mortimore Courts apply a presumption against extraterritoriality when assessing the geographic scope of federal statutes. Unless Congress has clearly indicated a statute regulates conduct abroad, courts will assume it applies only within the United States. The Supreme Court has vigorously enforced the presumption over the last three decades,[1]

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Look What You Made Me Do: A Critique of the Updated Critical Technologies List and Implications It Will Have on Foreign Investments

By Elisabeth Bernabe International conflict manifests in different forms. When one thinks of war, naturally they think of armed assaults conducted through the deployment of destructive weapons. Additionally, conflict can be unleashed online vis-à-vis harmful cyberattacks and foreign vigilante hackers. However, conflict largely manifests through the chess game of international

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The New Ukrainian Refugee Crisis

By Paige Clark The world is watching in horror as Ukrainians face a Russian invasion and unfathomable violence. Many people have fled from Ukraine in the past week; most have gone to Poland, Hungary, Moldova, Romania, and Slovakia. [1]  Time will tell if the fighting resolves quickly enough to avoid

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Guatemala Faces Challenges in Efforts to Fulfill Commitment to End Hunger by 2030

By Michael Duchesne On May 19, 1988, Guatemala signed the International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights (“the Covenant”)[1] and thereby undertook the duty to respect, protect, and fulfill the rights guaranteed by the treaty.[2] Article 11 of the Covenant recognizes the right of all citizens to “adequate food”

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