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Blog

Chinese Crackdown of Cryptocurrency and Implications for the Future of Crypto

By Jimmy Pierce Over the past two decades, China has become an economic powerhouse, with its GDP soaring from $1.211 trillion in 2000 to $14.723 trillion in 2020.[1] China’s increase in economic prosperity has coincided with a newfound role on the international stage, and with international projects such as the

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The Taliban Control Afghanistan, Now What?

By Zack Taylor As the final C-17 lifted from Hamid Karzai International Airport at 11:59 PM on 30 August 2021, the United States’ military involvement in Afghanistan came to a close.[1] In the final month of the US withdrawal, the Taliban launched a lightning offensive against the government of Afghanistan,

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The Long Jurisdictional Reach of Picard

By Ethan Yaro Near the end of 2019 the Second Circuit reached a decision in In re Irving H. Picard, Tr. for Liquidation of Bernard L. Madoff Investment Securities (hereinafter “Picard”), holding that a United States bankruptcy court has jurisdiction over international transfers between two international entities.[1] The Picard case

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Notice of Termination in the U.S. and Canada: Two Contrasting Approaches

By Lindsey Drozd In the United States, there is a common understanding that employees must give their employers two weeks’ notice before they resign. Two weeks’ notice is often described as a “courtesy,” but it’s so universally expected that it’s more of a social requirement. Skipping this step can result

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Looking for American Action on Climate Change after the Paris Agreement? Don’t Look to the United States’ Judiciary.

By Tanner Sparrow As global carbon emissions continue to rise following the Paris Agreement and the earth continues to speed towards irreversible climate change, the Paris Agreement, despite its successes, faces repeated criticism.[1] Given that all nations’ current targets are not enough cumulatively to keep the climate from staying below

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Sanctions and Counter-sanctions Between the West and China over Xinjiang

By Wesley Cong Cao On March 22, the United States, the European Union, the United Kingdom, and Canada imposed sanctions on Chinese officials over human rights issues in Xinjiang.[1] The “united transatlantic response,” according to U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken, was the first such coordinated Western action against Beijing

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