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Blog

Foreign Privilege: What’s So Controversial About Investor—State Dispute Settlement

By Ryan Miao Investor-State Dispute Settlement (“ISDS”) has always been a controversial issue in international law discussions. This is partially due to a fundamental feature of ISDS is that it only applies to foreign entities and not domestic investors. ISDS represents a notion of “foreign privilege” – the essential characteristic

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Ukraine at War: What Can We Do?

These are terrifying times for the people of Ukraine and horrifying for the rest of the world, witnessing a superpower invade its European neighbor for the first time since World War Two. On February 24, 2022, Vladimir Putin ordered a full-scale invasion of Ukraine, claiming there was a constant threat

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We Did, Actually, Start the Fire – Now We Have to Try to Put it Out: Litigation as a Strategy to Fight Climate Change

By Maria Saracino-Lowe The world as we know it is, basically, ending. And it’s our fault. Anthropogenic climate change is triggering weather extremes throughout the world, with increasingly frequent “hot extremes, marine heatwaves, heavy precipitation, and, in some regions, agricultural and ecological droughts.”[1] Many of these changes cannot be reversed

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The Reasons of the Emerge of Personal Bankruptcy Regulation in China

By Olivia Dai Among the world’s top ten economies (2018), only China mainland, Brazil, and China’s Macao region used to not have personal bankruptcy systems.[1] But Shenzhen, a Special Economic Zone of China mainland first provides legal rescue for honest but unfortunate individual bankrupts by enacting the Personal Bankruptcy Regulation

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You Don’t Have to Go Home, But You Can’t Stay Here: How the U.S.’s Remain in Mexico Protocol Violates the Convention Against Torture

By Lexie Robinson The Migrant Protection Protocols (known as the ‘Remain in Mexico’ protocol) “authorizes the Government to return certain third-country nationals arriving in the United States to Mexico or Canada for the duration of their removal proceedings.”[1] This means that asylum seekers traveling through Mexico from other countries can

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The Implications of the Rwandan Government Sentencing Paul Rusesabagina, Who Saved 1,268 People During the Rwandan Genocide, to Prison on Terrorism Charges

By Min Ji Kim Over a span of 100 days in 1994, an estimated 800,000 to one million people were slaughtered during the Rwandan Genocide.[1] The genocide arose from hundreds of years of conflict between the Hutus and the Tutsis, two ethnic groups of Rwanda, exacerbated by Belgian and German

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I Don’t Know About You, But Merging Companies Might Not Be Feelin’ 22

By Hattie Van Metre Merging companies are facing higher scrutiny from the European Union’s competition regulatory body, creating uncertainty for transactions that might have otherwise escaped review. In September 2020, Commissioner Margrethe Vestager of the European Commission (“EC”)[1] announced that the EC would begin evaluating mergers “worth reviewing at the

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